Ishmael Reed and Multiculturism

By HBW Contributor:  Jerry W.Ward, Jr., Professor of English at Dillard University. In The Gift of Black Folk (1924), W. E. B. DuBois asserted that the meek in the new world “not only inherited the earth but made their heritage a thing of questing for eternal youth, of fruitful labor, or joy and music, of the free spirit and of the ministering hand, of wide […]

Notes on John Edgar Wideman’s Fanon

             By HBW Contributor:  Jerry W.Ward, Jr., Professor of English at Dillard University. John Edgar Wideman is arguably one of the most serious living writers in the Americas, and one might dream that the Nobel Prize folk will recognize his value.  Remembering where the wealth that finances Nobel Prizes came from, one might decide to kill the dream and return to the more noble space […]

Digging Amiri Baraka

By HBW Contributor: Jerry W. Ward, Jr., Professor of English at Dillard University.  Baraka, Amiri.  Digging: The Afro-American Soul of American Classical Music. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2009. “Man is capable of doing what he is incapable of imagining.  His head tills the galaxy of the absurd.”           René Char, Leaves of Hypnos, Note 227 1963.  I discover Leroi Jones and “The End of […]

Of Literature and Humanity

             Jerry W. Ward, Jr., Professor of English at Dillard University, is the author of The Katrina Papers: A Journal of Trauma and Recovery (UNO Press, 2008). Professor Ward has been a faithful guest blogger for the HBW. Having been informed recently by a young philosopher that metaphysics has been banished from the realm of serious philosophy, I shall assume the premature death of African American literature […]

Tradition and Acknowledgement in Combat Zones

Jerry W. Ward, Jr., Professor of English at Dillard University, is the author of The Katrina Papers: A Journal of Trauma and Recovery (UNO Press, 2008). Professor Ward has been a faithful guest blogger for the HBW offering literary criticism on Richard Wright, James Baldwin, and creative writing entries. Our tradition of black writing is coterminous with the tradition of black literature; whether we speak of literature […]

African American Literature and Ecocriticism: Exploring Richard Wright

Dr. Gregory E. Rutledge, an assistant professor with a joint appointment in University of Nebraska-Lincoln ‘s English Dept. and Institute for Ethnic Studies. His publications (criticism, essays, fiction, poetry, and photography) have appeared or will have appear in Callaloo, African American Review, Amherst Review, Yonsei Law Journal (South Korea), Journal of College and University Law, Interventions, Wasafiri(United Kingdom), Black Magnolias, ANQ (Annotated Notes Quarterly), The […]

Outfaulknering Faulkner: Ralph Ellison’s Juneteenth

Jennifer M. Colatosti is a PhD student in Literature and Creative Writing at the University of Kansas. She holds an MA in the same from Ohio University. Her critical work often engages critical race theory to question the construction of American identities and her creative work explores the intertwined roles of family and place in the individual’s understanding of identity. When I reencountered Faulkner as […]